I Never Claimed to be a Biographer


Author, J T Fisher

Judy Fisher was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and became a south Florida transplant in the early seventies. The youngest of four and the only female, she learned early to be tough, and to speak out. She also gained a love for sports and was always the fifth guy on the basketball team or the ninth on the baseball team.  Her true love is music and theater, and of course, the written word.

With a degree in journalism and a minor in theater and having spent an adult career in the not-for-profit world in public relations and development, where she did a lot of speech writing and created a lot of marketing materials, Judy has finally been able to pursue her passion for writing with a purpose other than one for which she was assigned.

She started out writing poetry and an empty nester blog to fill time that was previously spent tending to her husband and two children. As she wrote and gained followers, she decided to try writing pure fiction.

Judy feels that a lot of women, especially of her generation, have struggled with many fears, questions, and issues growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, and many still carry those fears coupled with the shame, embarrassment, and skeletons that affect the way they live their lives even today. She was one of them. She has found through her own life experiences that people often live vicariously through characters in fiction or in movies and television who face and conquer the same challenges they face in their own lives. She has chosen to write lighter fiction that deals with some of issues that people, mostly women, find it difficult to face or even talk about.

Her first book, “A Life, Well . . . Lived!,” which she describes as a thinly veiled auto-biography, is intended to share the life Dana Gordon, a young lady who experienced and hid a lot of things that had happened to her but, through unusual circumstance, was able to see the error of her own ways and get the chance to live her entire life, all with the wisdom we only gain from age.

A subsequent title deals with male repression, in “Okay, So I Lied!” when Jill Kelly musters the strength to defy her father’s wishes without his knowledge to follow her own dreams. Unfortunately for Jill, she learns the hard way that lying her way through life is not a good solution to her problems. Honesty, she finds out in the end, would have been the best policy.

In “Voices from the Ledge,” to be released in the fall of 2018, Judy explores the sensitive yet very timely topic of suicide as her main character deals with empty nest syndrome coupled with depression, leading her to falsely believe she has no more worth or value. Meeting other women in what seems to be her journey to the end, she discovers that her life isn’t so bad after all, and her new-found friends have an eerie way of imparting that to her.

 

Look for Judy on the speakers’ circuit in this new age of empowered women.

 

www.jtfisherauthor.com

 

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